Blog Archives

Rosary, as belt

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That rosary, as a belt. Those worn-out knees.

There’s nothing more to say.

Elm Grove Cemetery
Alpine, Texas
photographed 1.19.2013

(I am gone for a while, and will not be responding to comments right away. But make some anyway, if you feel inclined, and I’ll get back to you – it just won’t be right away.)

The stars, at night

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The old Granada Theatre has been repurposed as an event center; the set-up for an upcoming event took on a magical glow from the sparkly chandelier, the softly draped tablecloths, and those stars.

And because there’s a certain song stuck in my mind, I’ll share it with you so you can have it stuck, too!

Alpine, Texas
photographed 1.18.2013

(I am gone for a while, and will not be responding to comments right away. But make some anyway, if you feel inclined, and I’ll get back to you – it just won’t be right away.)

Change is constant

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You’ve seen this place before. Here, and here, and here.

And it’s even in the header of the blog.

The place keeps changing. Not for the better, maybe, except for someone like me. You know how I am…

Bula School
near Bula, Texas
photographed 2.16.2014

An ad hoc arrangement

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If you are the sort of person who appreciates orderly arrangements, even in alleys, this would not be a good place to go. There’s not one single thing here that looks like someone planned it; instead it has the feel of having just sprouted up, like weeds after a soaking rain.

Two things to note:
1. That window on the left really IS wonky; that’s not an unresolved lens issue.
2. Check out the concrete blocks holding up the meters!

Alpine, Texas
photographed 1.18.2013

Bedlam

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Here’s another view of this storm, taken just south of the Canadian River.

The geography here is known as the Breaks, rough and rugged terrain that’s very different from what you’d expect to see on the Plains. Barry Lopez’s excellent book Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape describes it this way:

Breaks, in the western United States, are tracts of rough, broken land, similar to badlands, that are of little commercial or utilitarian value – stretches of terrain, cracked and fissured by arroyos and ravines, nearly impossible to negotiate for any distance on foot or by horse. A dramatic example is found in the Texas Panhandle, where the course of the Canadian River abruptly fractures the smooth face of the Llano Estacado into a virtual bedlam of steep hills and tight passages.

There’s bedlam, too, in the sky above the breaks.

near the Canadian River
Roberts County, Texas
photographed 8.28.2014

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