Formidable Door Stop

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I guess those excellent wooden doors weren’t staying shut, so the spool was put into service as a door stop; those Nebraskans are resourceful like that.

Rockville, Nebraska
photographed 8.30.2014

Posted on November 23, 2016, in Photography and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 8 Comments.

  1. What character the building has. What characters entered there. Much more than the public bathroom (?) in the background. Guess those Nebraskans know a thing or two about resourcefulness.

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  2. I like how they used those bricks with the diagonal in the glaze/finish. I wonder if those are kiln-accidents from the spacers they sit on during firing that some resourceful bricklayer set aside as accent pieces.

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    • I don’t know what makes those diagonal lines in the bricks. Putting them in on purpose doesn’t make too much sense to me. But neither does having that many accidentally marked ones. One of us should research that, and let me know.

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      • I have a lot of wood-fired pottery and it has the marks from the little tripods used for stacking in the kiln, as well as differential exposure to flames and heat during firing. I can imagine that bricks were stacked with spacers to allow the heat to circulate and that these spacers would leave their marks. I can also imagine the average bricklayer turning those marks inwards so as not to catch sh!t from the foreman, or architect. As to research, there is lots of stuff about brick. I have delved there before when excavating Roman bricks, or medieval bricks in London, as well as some of the locally early bricks here in British Columbia.
        I wonder how many buildings in Texas have these in their walls, and whether the occupants would care: http://www.ruffbrickroad.com/historicaberbrick.htm

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      • So, that deal on the brick in the link is a “good luck sign”?

        The next time you’re in central Nebraska, you should stop by this place to examine the bricks in more detail. They’re not Roman or medieval, as far as I know, but I’ll defer to your expert opinion.

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      • These days they call it alt-luck.

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