Bubbles

We used to have a cat named Balboa; she was very cat-like, in the sense that she didn’t really care for people, and only wanted to be petted on her own terms, and spent a lot of time hiding somewhere. I believe she could have been described as “dour.”

My little granddaughter re-named the cat, calling her Bubbles. It was pretty funny, since the name implied the exact opposite of the cat’s personality, and we sort of changed the cat’s name on the spot. (Which probably made her even more dour.) Poor Bubbles/Balboa went off to kitty heaven last year, but as soon as I saw this odd window display, I was immediately reminded of her and that new name.

Hot Springs, Arkansas
photographed 10.8.2018

Heavenward

The main rule at Thorncrown Chapel is that you have to stay seated while you’re taking photos. On the one hand, I appreciated that rule, because that kept people out of the image (and you know how I am about people!). But on the other hand, it made it a little challenging to get photos that didn’t end up looking like every other photo ever made of the place.

So, here’s a tip if you go: put the camera on the ledge by the window and shoot straight up. Not only will you get this vertiginous view, but you can get an interesting reflection thrown in!

Thorncrown Chapel
Eureka Springs, Arkansas
photographed 10.6.2018

Branches

Fay Jones – Thorncrown’s architect – was a genius: look at how the structure mimics the tree branches, and how the light falls into the building the same way it falls on the forest floor.

Thorncrown Chapel
Eureka Springs, Arkansas
photographed 10.5.2018

Inside/Outside

My favorite part of the chapel was the way the window design blurred the boundaries between inside and outside, making sitting in a pew in the chapel feel like sitting on a log in the woods.

Thorncrown Chapel
Eureka Springs, Arkansas
photographed 10.6.2018

The Way

The Patient Spouse and I recently took a trip to Arkansas and saw this architectural landmark – Thorncrown Chapel – for the first time. The P. S. has loved this building since the first time it showed up in the pages of architectural magazines.

It is certainly worth the visit, and we went there two days in a row.

This is the view from the walk to the building; starting tomorrow I’ll post a few images from the interior.

If you want more information, you can see the chapel’s website or the Wikipedia page. And, for fun, check out the 50 most extraordinary churches of the world (it’s number 49).

Thorncrown Chapel
Eureka Springs, Arkansas
photographed 10.6.2018

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