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street-side braids

Based on how many times lately I’ve mentioned the joys of exploring Sicilian streets, it’s probably safe to assume that part of the trip made a big impression on me.

In the US, there’s an urban planning thing right now called “complete streets” which is defined by Smart Growth America this way:

Complete Streets are streets for everyone. Complete Streets is an approach to planning, designing, building, operating, and maintaining streets that enables safe access for all people who need to use them, including pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and transit riders of all ages and abilities.

I can’t argue with the premise, but the results are way less organic that what I recently saw. For example, the opportunity of getting street-side braids is NEVER listed as a thing that ought to happen. Yet, here in Palermo, a braider and an apprentice braider are busy – and they’re working right there on the street.

It was glorious.

Palermo, Sicily
photographed 8.31.2022

both sides of the street

This? Just a little scene I happened to notice that day we walked through Caltabellotta. I loved those narrow streets, with evidence of lives being lived at every turn. It was invigorating and interesting.

This particular scene caught my attention because the mirror reflected the other side of the street (which wasn’t all that far away) and showed how, even though I was standing in the shade, right behind me was full, intense, and direct sunlight. Plus I liked the mailbox and the streaks of paint on the walls. Plus, as you know, I fell in love with Sicily.

Caltabellotta, Sicily
photographed 9.5.2022

madonna of the piazzetta

It is impossible to find the right words to convey how magical it was to walk the streets of these ancient towns, not really knowing where we were; new discoveries were at  every turn. The light shifted. The narrow street widened into a piazza. Someone was feeding the stray cats. You could smell someone else’s lunch. Maybe there was a hint of a breeze. A motorbike went by, just inches away from walls, pedestrians. And, once, as the street turned into a piazzetta, a madonna observed all the happenings.

Caltabellotta, Sicily
photographed 9.5.2022

laundry minimalism

Over at the Valley of the Temples, I tried some minimalist shots, with mostly sky in the frame.

And then, a few days later, as we walked through the ancient mountain-top town of Caltabellotta*, I tried again, this time with laundry.

Caltabellotta, Sicily
photographed 9.5.2022

*It’s one of the oldest occupied towns in Sicily, with origins dating back 2000 years before Common Era. There’s evidence of Sicani, Greek, Arab, Norman, and Jewish heritage here.

boys at play (beside World War II ruins)

As unbelievable as it seems to someone whose city was never bombed, there are still building ruins in the heart of Palermo left over from 1943, when Allied and German forces battled for control of the island. (Read more here.)

One of the ruins was very near where we stayed, and the wire fencing on the left side of the photo surrounds the rubble. But, even with war ruins that are almost eighty years old, life in the rest of the neighborhood goes on, with boys playing a made-up game as two young women strolled along. (And as a quartet of photographers watched and, possibly, made more than a few images.)

Palermo, Sicily
photographed 8.31.2022

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