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Going up against chaos

My regular reader(s) already knows that I often photograph restrooms, and that reader is nice enough to not laugh to my face about that.

But this is a reason why I have that weird little habit: that turned-over trash can was just ASKING to be photographed, if you ask me.

Another one of my weird photographic habits, which my brain tends to do all on its own without any assistance from me, is to place song lyrics in my head when I see scenes like this. Usually they are Bruce Cockburn lyrics and usually they don’t seem to have a very strong connection to the actual scene. Today’s lyrics, suggested by Melinda’s Brain, come from a song called “Going up Against Chaos.” And if you listen to the lyrics and can figure out a connection to this photo, please let me know: I’ll be damned if I can tell what it is.

Slaton, Texas
photographed 2.17.2021

Boundless

“Clouds overhead were ghostly gray.” – even though these clouds aren’t really what I’d call “ghostly gray” my brain still made the connection between the clouds and the song lyrics, which are from Bruce Cockburn’s song “Boundless.” (Another part of the song says, “The sky looks troubled but I feel free” but my brain wasn’t smart enough to make that connection.)

Anyway, I decided to listen the song while I wrote this post. I’d forgotten that the song started and ended with chimes; I have the same chimes in my backyard, so for a second I was confused if I was hearing the yard or the song. (The chimes are made by Music of the Spheres, in Austin. If you need chimes in your yard, check it out. And if you don’t need chimes in your yard, check it out anyway. You can play the chimes, a surprisingly pleasant pastime.)

Oh, and this picture? Just something I saw last fall in Minnesota.

Iona’s Beach Scientific and Natural Area, Minnesota
photographed 9.25.2019

Could be looking right past

The way this place is being demolished (or, maybe, renovated), it’s possible to see all the way through a room, two bathrooms, another room all the way to the other side of the building.

If you’ve been around this blog for a while, you may know that my brain sometimes makes strange connections between a scene I’m shooting and a song. And usually, only my brain gets the reasons for the connections. (And, yes, it would be nice for the brain to share with the rest of us, but that seems unlikely, so here we are.) And I bet you just can’t wait to see what sort of odd connection this thing conjured up.)

It was a few lines from “Bone in My Ear,” by Bruce Cockburn:

In my heart there’s a an image
Like looking through glass
Could be looking at me
Could be looking right past

(You can see/hear the song here. Also, I was at that very concert. In case you were wondering what I was up to last April.)

what’s left of the Days Inn
Lubbock, Texas
photographed 2.22.2019

“These shoes have walked some strange streets.”

So, these shoes. These giant shoes that I found hanging on a stop sign on Fabrication Avenue in Dallas. Goodness.

You may recall how I sometimes link photos with seemingly-random lyrics (usually from Bruce Cockburn). The only surprise here is that the Cockburn lyrics that came to mind here could actually apply to these shoes: These shoes have walked some strange streets. (from “The Gift.”)

Also, later that very same day, guess who I saw in concert? Bruce Cockburn. Did he play “The Gift” that night? Yes, he did. I love it when stuff like this happens.

along Fabrication Avenue
Dallas, Texas
photographed 4.14.2018

PS: If you want to see these shoes in color, head over to my Instagram (I’m melgal) and scroll down a ways. You’ll probably easily spot the image…

Infinity always gives me vertigo

020217

Infinity always gives me vertigo
And fills me up with grace

“Mystery”
Bruce Cockburn

Spur, Texas
photographed 3.14.2015

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